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3 pm, Nov 30 Nov 30, 2012

Will there be a breakthrough at the climate talks in Doha?

Will there be a breakthrough at the climate talks in Doha? Talk to CNN-IBN's Environment Editor Bahar Dutt to find out.
12 questions answered
  • Do you feel that with big power like US are conscious today of climate with calamities like various superstorms which have become a recurring feature Asked by: Hitesh
  • Bahar Dutt hi Hitesh thanks for writing in! I think the recent events following SuperStorm Sandy has definitely woken up the US. We have even heard President Obama who stated recently that 'I am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behaviour and carbon emissions'. I am not sure whether this will translate into effective action on the ground. Lets hope the President he does much more in terms of policy in his second innings!
  • Development VS Heritage and environment. KKNPP gets blocked. They say it is the cheapest and most clean source of energy. Whai is your take on it ?/ Asked by: sundar1950in
  • Bahar Dutt i am not sure what KKNPP refers to here?
  • Whatw as the last round .Was it in RIO ? where did we last create an impression that INDIA was one which prevented consensus on the resolutions ?? Asked by: sundar1950in
  • Bahar Dutt hi Sundar, the last summit was in Durban, the year before at Cancun and the biggest one was in Copenhagen when world leaders were involved. Yes india has been seen as a deal breaker, but there is a reason for that. India has been stating that the developed world have historic emissions they must pay for, and that developing countries too have the right to grow. Its a tough one i guess, a classic case of environment vs development!
  • How about the koyoto protocol ? it has any significance or not ?? Asked by: sundar1950in
  • Bahar Dutt hi Sundar, this is perhaps the last chance the world has to salvage the Kyoto protocol. The protocol is important as it is the single legally binding treaty mandated by the UN which distinguishes between the developed and the developing world in terms of their responsibilities on carbon emissions. The countries meeting in Doha will have a tough task getting the world to agree on the need to extend Kyoto Protocol
  • I feel that you have done new fields like environment journalism a great service which is a new area, but I want to ask is why Kyoto and Rio have been talking shops and have not brought in tangible difference to environment issues around the world Asked by: Manav
  • Bahar Dutt hi Manav thanks for writing in and for your kind words. I completely share your views. There is a growing cynicism about such international negotiations. I can tell you at Copenhagen , in 2009 there was a lot of hope , but since the world community could not agree on fixing responsibilities the climate movement lost its momentum.
  • do you think there can be any breakthrough when it comes to minimizing industrial growth, which is not practically possible looking at the demand, and which is the main source of pollution? do you think kyoto protocol was successful? Asked by: pc
  • Bahar Dutt hi PC i think industrial growth cannot be unlimited. We cannot go on assuming in the myth of superabundance that nature will always provide that our rivers and air can continue to replenish and grow and clean themselves. We need active interventions and greater realisation of how our own lifestyles impact the environment. And yes i think the Kyoto protocol had a role to play, now question is if the world community will give it a new lease of life!
  • The average temperatures have been going up by a centigrade almost every successive year. Are the autorities seriously aware of this.is it possible for any sane action to keep things under control,before we also feel the heat like one experienced in SAHARA. Asked by: sundar1950in
  • Bahar Dutt hi Sundar according to the Inter Government Panel on Climate Change in the last 100 years there has been a roughly 1.33 centigrade rise in global temperatures. Climate change has to be measured over a timeline at least 30 years for it to be considered so, not on a year to year basis!
  • What has been the role of Indian environment ministry as far as climate negotiations are concerned as current minister has also been accused of playing spoilsport in negotiations at various forums Asked by: Manush
  • Bahar Dutt i think the Environment Ministry has been succesful every year especially last year at Durban at warding off pressures from the developed world. From our side thats success i guess from the developed world side she played 'spoilsport'. But i have to say she was applauded for her role at the negotiations last year!
  • the talk of carbon foot prints and saving the atmosphere from pollution all happens in an Air conditioned ambience which by itself is not a natural climate and adds to the pollution effects. Asked by: sundar1950in
  • Bahar Dutt I agree!
  • Do you feel that with countries like India, China and US being obsessed about economic growth we can ever have honest climate negotiations as industialisation is an rival of climate negotiations Asked by: Ravi
  • Bahar Dutt hi Ravi yes i think both the developed and the developing world have focussed too much on industrialisation than looking for cleaner, low carbon options to growth which will generate livelihoods and money. And therein lies the challenge
  • Do you feel that profits of big corporates like BP and Exxon will be adversely effected as it pays panelties for oil spills and bribes local govts for not following norms so why can't it follow norms in the interest of the worlk Asked by: Ravi
  • Bahar Dutt of course. And you will find that most of the climate naysayer lobbies are funded by oil companies!
  • Why have carbon tax and carbon credits not yielded desired results as companies are still not conscious of environment as various firms in mining, heavy industries flout norms Asked by: Hitesh
  • Bahar Dutt well carbon credits have ended up being a bad deal for the Planet. because all it does is encourage companies to go on polluting with a small price. I think the only solution is to restrict the amount of natural resources available for exploitation.

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Bahar Dutt
Environment Editor, CNN-IBN