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    A look at the 8 stadiums to be used for Euro 2012

    A brief look at the eight stadiums to be used for the European Championship.

    Warsaw: A brief look at the eight stadiums to be used for the European Championship:

    Warsaw, National Stadium

    The National Stadium in Warsaw will host the opening match of the Euro 2012 tournament, when Poland plays Greece on June 8.

    The stadium was built on the site of the Tenth Anniversary Stadium, which hosted football matches and other sporting events from 1955 until the 1980s. The old stadium was partly constructed with rubble collected from the site of the Warsaw Uprising, when the Polish resistance tried to liberate the city from Nazi Germany.

    The new stadium, which opened in February and is the home stadium of Poland's national team, has a capacity of 50,000 for Euro 2012, making it the biggest of Poland's four venues for the event. It is located on the eastern banks of the Vistula in the district of Praga Poludnie. Its red-and-white facade resembles a waving Polish flag.

    The National Stadium will host five matches at the tournament, including three in the first round and one of the semi-finals.

    Matches: Poland vs. Greece on June 8; Poland vs. Russia on June 12; Greece vs. Russia on June 16; Quarter-final No. 1 on June 21; Semi-final No. 2 on June 28.

    Gdansk, Arena Gdansk

    The stadium in Gdansk, which will seat 40,000 spectators for Euro 2012, includes a hotel and roller skating rink. It was opened last July, and its exterior resembles amber, a gem that can be found along the Baltic coast. The first international match at the stadium, between Poland and Germany, ended in a 2-2 draw.

    The Arena Gdansk, which will host four matches, is near the Old Town and airport.

    Matches: Spain vs. Italy on June 10; Spain vs. Ireland on June 14; Croatia vs. Spain on June 18; Quarter-final No. 2 on June 22.

    Poznan, Municipal Stadium

    Formerly the biggest club ground in Poland, the Municipal Stadium will have a capacity of 40,000 fans for Euro 2012.

    The stadium has been renovated and it reopened in September 2010 with a concert by rocker Sting. Two clubs share the stadium, Lech Poznan and Warta Poznan, but Spain has also had its success at the venue, winning the European Under-19 Championship in 2006.

    Poland beat Ivory Coast 3-1 in the first international match at the stadium on Nov. 17, 2010. At Euro 2012, the Municipal Stadium will host three group matches.

    Matches: Ireland vs. Croatia on June 10; Italy vs. Croatia on June 14; Italy vs. Ireland on June 18.

    Wroclaw, Municipal Stadium

    The Municipal Stadium in Wroclaw resembles a Chinese lantern and can seat 40,000 spectators for Euro 2012 matches. The venue was officially opened last September with a George Michael concert, but that came a week after a heavyweight boxing title fight between Vitali Klitschko and Tomasz Adamek.

    The stadium, which is home to Slask Wroclaw, is connected to the center of the city by a new tram line and was built as part of a complex that includes offices, conference halls, a fitness center and a casino. There will be three group matches at the stadium, including co-host Poland against the Czech Republic.

    Matches: Russia vs. Czech Republic on June 8; Greece vs. Czech Republic on June 12; Czech Republic vs. Poland on June 16.

    Kiev, Olympic Stadium

    The biggest venue at Euro 2012 with a capacity of 60,000 spectators, the Olympic Stadium in Kiev will host the final on July 1. The stadium was first opened in 1923 and is the home of Ukraine's national football team. After several name changes, it became the Olympic Stadium because it hosted several football matches at the 1980 Moscow Olympics. The Olympic Stadium will host five matches at the tournament, including the final on July 1.

    Matches: Ukraine vs. Sweden on June 11; Sweden vs. England on June 15; Sweden vs. France on June 19; Quarter-final No. 4 on June 24; Final on July 1.

    Lviv, Arena Lviv

    Opened in October 2011, the Arena Lviv is the smallest of the eight Euro 2012 stadiums with a seating capacity of only 30,000.

    The stadium, which will host three matches at Euro 2012, is home to FC Karpaty Lviv and located on the outskirts of the city.

    Matches: Germany vs. Portugal on June 9; Denmark vs. Portugal on June 13; Denmark vs. Germany on June 17.

    Kharkiv, Metalist Stadium

    The home of Metalist Kharkiv, the Metalist Stadium has been improved several times since its original opening in 1926. The latest renovation was completed three years ago and it was reopened in December 2009. The latest improvements, which coincide with the multipurpose Metalist City complex, include undersoil heating and LED scoreboards.

    The stadium will seat 35,000 for Euro 2012, but it can fit more than 38,000 fans for non-European Championship matches. At Euro 2012, it will host three group matches.

    Matches: Netherlands vs. Denmark on June 9; Netherlands vs. Germany on June 13; Portugal vs. Netherlands on June 17.

    Donetsk, Donbass Arena

    The Donbass Arena, which is home to Shakhtar Donetsk, was opened in August 2009 and cost about €320 million ($424 million) to build. With an illuminated exterior and infrared heating, the venue is one of the biggest at the tournament with a seating capacity of 50,000. It is located in central Donetsk and at night lights up the huge fountain built nearby.

    The stadium will host five matches at Euro 2012, including one of the semi-finals.

    Matches: France vs. England on June 11; Ukraine vs. France on June 15; England vs. Ukraine on June 19; Quarter-final No. 3 on June 23; Semi-final No. 1 on June 27.