ibnlive » India

Jul 07, 2012 at 12:34pm IST

Bailable warrant against Ramadoss in college scam

New Delhi: A Delhi court on Saturday issued a bailable warrant against former Health Minister Anbumani Ramadoss after he failed to appear before it in a case of allegedly allowing a medical college to go ahead with admissions without having sufficient resources.

Special CBI Judge Talwant Singh issued bailable warrant of Rs 10,000 against PMK leader Ramadoss after the probe agency told the court that summons have not been served to him as he has gone to Bangalore from Chennai for medical treatment.

"I want his presence in the court. It seems Ramadoss is avoiding the summons. Let bailable warrants of a sum of Rs 10,000 be issued against him and the same should be executed by the DIG of concerned branch of the CBI for July 20," the judge said.

Bailable warrant against Ramadoss in college scam

Anbumani Ramadoss allegedly allowed a medical college to go ahead with admissions without having sufficient resources.

Besides Ramadoss, who was the Union Minister of Health and Family Welfare from May, 2004 till April, 2009 in UPA-I, CBI has filed charge sheet against K V S Rao, Director in Cabinet Secretariat, Sudershan Kumar, Section Officer of Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MHFW) and Dr J S Dhupia and Dr Dipendra Kumar Gupta of Safdarjung Hospital.

The charge sheet, filed before Special CBI Judge Talwant Singh, also named Suresh Singh Bhadoria, Chairman of Index Medical College Hospital and Research Centre (IMCHRC), Dr S K Tongia, ex-Dean of the college, Dr K K Saxena, Medical Director of the college, Nitin Gothwal and Dr Pawan Bhambani.

According to the charge sheet, Ramadoss and other accused conspired with each other in permitting IMCHRC admission for second year despite the fact that the Medical Council of India (MCI) and a committee appointed by the Supreme Court had "repeatedly recommended" that IMCHRC was not having sufficient faculty and clinical material required as per MCI norms.

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