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CA says night Test cricket inevitable

Press Trust Of India
Oct 30, 2012 at 12:05pm IST

While announcing the new ruling, the ICC said that the home and visiting boards will decide on the hours of play which will be six hours of scheduled play per day apart from deciding on the precise brand, type and colour of ball to be used for the match. Sutherland believed that the shorter formats of the game had shown that batsmen could make big scores under lights. He also said that he didn't want to create expectations that day-night Tests are just around the corner.

"Finding a Test ball that is as easily visible in the day as it is at night is still a technical work in progress that the ICC is now leading and it has not yet been possible to predict when such a ball might be available," the CA chief said. "The traditional red ball is not regarded as suitable for night cricket because it is not as visible at night as it is in the day, and the ODI white ball is not suitable for Tests as it is not as durable as the red ball and does not last as well as a Test ball needs to last," Sutherland elaborated.

"Experiments with other colours such as pink, orange and yellow have seen some promising developments in recent times and Cricket Australia will, together with the ICC and ball manufacturers, continue to encourage research and development that delivers a ball with the optimal colour and durability for Test cricket," he added. While announcing the new ruling, the ICC said that the home and visiting boards will decide on the hours of play which will be six hours of scheduled play per day apart from deciding on the precise brand, type and colour of ball to be used for the match.

Cricket Australia says night Test cricket inevitable

While announcing the new ruling, the ICC said that the home and visiting boards will decide on the hours of play.

Sutherland believed that the shorter formats of the game had shown that batsmen could make big scores under lights. He also said that he didn't want to create expectations that day-night Tests are just around the corner. "Finding a Test ball that is as easily visible in the day as it is at night is still a technical work in progress that the ICC is now leading and it has not yet been possible to predict when such a ball might be available," the CA chief said.

"The traditional red ball is not regarded as suitable for night cricket because it is not as visible at night as it is in the day, and the ODI white ball is not suitable for Tests as it is not as durable as the red ball and does not last as well as a Test ball needs to last," Sutherland elaborated. "Experiments with other colours such as pink, orange and yellow have seen some promising developments in recent times and Cricket Australia will, together with the ICC and ball manufacturers, continue to encourage research and development that delivers a ball with the optimal colour and durability for Test cricket," he added.

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