Quick Links

    News
    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    • 0

    'SA cricket divided over IPL bonus saga'

    Jacques Faul, who quit as CSA chief executive on Thursday evening, said so in his letter of resignation.

    Johannesburg: South African cricket remains divided over the 2009 saga in which now suspended chief executive Gerald Majola paid himself and other Cricket South Africa staff more than R4 million in IPL 2 bonuses, according to acting CSA chief executive Jacques Faul.

    Faul tendered his resignation Thursday evening, but is reconsidering ahead of a CSA board meeting next Thursday. "Cricket has been deeply divided into camps due to the ongoing bonus saga," Faul wrote in his letter of resignation, which was quoted in the daily Business Day.

    The two-year bonus crisis led to the suspension of Majola after the Nicholson inquiry instituted by Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula recommended disciplinary action and possible criminal charges against him. Faul said amidst sponsors shying away from CSA, he had negotiated with the company Momentum for a major sponsorship announced last month, but was now being accused of taking sides in the bonus saga because a director at Momentum, Paul Harris, was one of those who had blown the whistle on the irregular IPL bonus payments when he was still a board member.

    "I sense some hostility towards me and am well aware that there is a campaign to discredit me by people, mainly outside cricket, but also within the formal cricket structure," Faul said in his letter. Faul has been lauded in recent months for his plans to implement the directive by Mbalula to restructure CSA.

    This would include fewer board members, and mean the demise of some of those who had not acted as the IPL saga played itself out over a lengthy period which twice saw CSA president Mtutuzeli Nyoka being ousted after he challenged Majola over the IPL bonuses. CSA insiders said Faul's relationship with board members who were intent on resisting change that could bring about their own demise had been frustrating him. They also cited tension between Faul and CSA acting president Willie Basson.

    But Basson came out in strong support of Faul. "The boards [members] are getting nervous because D-Day is getting closer and half of them will no longer be part of the structure," Basson told the daily.