Doomsayer 'flabbergasted' that world didn't end

ibnlive.com
May 23, 2011 at 01:45pm IST

New Delhi: The religious broadcaster who made the world's biggest mistake, twice, is bewildered that things did not go according to his prediction and the world did not end at 6 pm on May 21.

Harold Camping, whose radio network is reported to be worth between USD 70 million and USD 120 million, was nowhere to be seen publicly Sunday after his prediction didn't come true, according to media reports on Monday.

Camping's Family Radio network in Oakland, California, broadcasts on 150 stations in the US, as well as reaching audiences in Europe, Asia and Africa.

Doomsayer 'flabbergasted' that world didn't end

"I'm looking for answers, but now I have nothing else to say," Camping said.

Tom Evans, a Family Radio board member, told ABC News Camping was at his Oakland home "somewhat bewildered" and "mystified" that the rapture did not happen.

ABC News quoted Evans as saying that he believed the public was owed an apology and the board would meet on Tuesday to figure out what to do.

"It has been a really tough weekend," the 89-year-old radio preacher who convinced hundreds of his followers that the world would end on Saturday at 6 pm, said.

"I'm looking for answers, but now I have nothing else to say," Camping said, adding "I'll be back to work Monday and will say more then."

Camping's prediction is based on his reading of the Bible and a timeline dating back to ancient events including the Biblical flood survived by Noah. Camping and his followers believed the beginning of the end will come on May 21, exactly 7,000 years since the flood in the biblical story of Noah's Ark.

Some 200 million people will be saved, Camping preaches, and those left behind will die in earthquakes, plagues, and other calamities until Earth is consumed by a fireball on October 21.

Camping had earlier said the world would end in 1994. Experts said on Monday, Camping's false prophecy could have big impacts on religion and colour the world's perception about Christianity.

Harold Camping's prediction of the rapture dominated the headlines over the weekend and predictably 'rapture' jokes overtook Twitter trends. "I don't want to sound like I'm bragging or anything, but this is the fifth end of the world I've survived#rapture," said Steven Johnston who uses the handle 'sjohnston436' on Twitter. Another user wrote "No rapture - just a huge hotel bill."

The 89-year-old retired civil engineer has built a multi-million-dollar nonprofit ministry based on his apocalyptic prediction. In 2009, the nonprofit reported in tax filings that it received USD 18.3 million in donations, and had assets of more than USD 104 million, including USD 34 million in stocks or other publicly traded securities.

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