ibnlive » India

Apr 22, 2013 at 06:43pm IST

Education will help address violence against women: Ranjana Kumari

Are the new anti-rape laws ineffective? Women's rights activist Ranjana Kumari joined IBNLive readers for an interaction on the issue.

Q. How to change mindset among small town men who come to work in metros? Asked by: Honey

A. The most effective way of addressing violence is through education. Gender sensitisation must be incorporated into school curriculum and training programmes are required in community centres and workplaces. Only once we start educating the population on women's rights and gender sensitivity will the mindset change.

Education will help address violence against women: Ranjana Kumari

Are the new anti-rape laws ineffective?

Q. Madam, what do you think of the responsibility factor of our police? They are more callous and deserve counseling and technical approach towards even for petty cases. Online FIR system should be implemented with immediate effect and responsibility of monitoring case progress should be shared with all that includes civil society. Asked by: Gopi

A. Reform within the police force is required to ensure that police personnel are responding to cases of violence against women with sensitivity. Gender sensitisation training is definitely required and more steps must be taken to increase the number of women police and to develop gender friendly police stations. But the responsibility does not lie only with the police. Violence against women is the result of ongoing patriarchy and the violence will not be stopped until we address this mindset.

Q. The new anti rate law will be effective only if it is implemented without any prejudice and crime against women can be reduced only people come to know of this law. it is the duty of the NGO and govt to make people aware of the law and its consequences. Asked by: vasanthi

A. Awareness building is essential to the implementation of the anti-rape law and all other legislation relating to women. The government must ensure that women are aware of their rights under the law and that they know the steps that they should take if these rights are violated. The more informed women are of their rights the more empowered they will become.

Q. How many individual cases have you taken up? Asked by: Subhas

A. CSR took up 22 cases in both Jan and February and 19 cases in March. Of these cases, 7 were children between the ages of 3-7 years. Last night we received one case of a 7 year old girl and today another case of a 17 year old girl.

Q. Madam, with all due respect to you, would like to articulate, there is no dearth of law that renders emphasis on women safety, how to curb crime and atrocities against women... we don't need more laws...the research on the subject brings forth horrible state-of-affairs. As per 2011 data, every hour 3 women/ girls are being raped, every hour one women succumb to the menace of dowry... what is shocking is, all the women (100 percent) who die of dowry are murdered by kin, including husband, mother-in-law... about 90 percent of women/ girls being raped are raped by offenders acquainted to victim, including father, uncle, cousin, friend... why we are unnecessary dragging police and judiciary under scanner...more than laws, social fabric needs overhaul...patriarchal convention needs change... Madam, your take... See these videos with my research... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRDRQNYtfw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VWDnpJlrlME regards. Rajiv Azad Asked by: Rajiv Azad

A. The data on violence against women is very concerning and we have to look at the causes of this violence. It is vital that our law enforcement and judiciary are responding to violence appropriately. However, you are correct. In order to really stop this violence we need to address the social mindset that normalises and justifies violence against women. We must build a society in which women are equal citizens, their rights are upheld, and gender-based violence is not condoned or excepted.

  • 5
  • 8
  • 0

Latest