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Meet the Indian innovators who have made a mark


Jaimon Joseph,CNN-IBN
May 12, 2012 at 09:49am IST

New Delhi: As India makes advances in the field of science and technology, from successfully launching nuclear missiles to inventing robots that treat cancer, one should not forget the people behind these innovations.

On the May 11, 1998, India exploded a nuclear device in the face of international sanctions. Since then, the country has felicitated engineers and scientists this day, people who have developed indigenous technology for the national good. May 11 is National Technology Day.

Former Indian President APJ Abdul Kalam himself stepped in to do the honours. Ramesh Sojira was the first to step up to the dias. He makes a software that matches satellite images with GPS co-ordinates. Generating three dimensional maps that are used to plan new cities, estimate farm and forest cover, even guard borders. Scanpoint Geomatics is the only Indian company to do this at half the cost of foreign firms.

Ramesh Sojitra, Managing Director, Scanpoint Geomatics Ltd, said, "It gives us pride to prove that we can compete with big MNCs."

K Guruswamy makes robots that can treat cancer. They find which part of one's body hides a tumour, then send in a needle into precisely that area. A burst of microwave radiation destroys the cancer without damaging the rest of the body. Almost 150 hospitals around the world now use Guruswamy's technology.

K Guruswamy, Director, Perfint HealthCare Corporation, said, "We are the only company in the world that offers the entire gamut of services in one package, from identifying to destroying the cancer."

Ashok Alturi of Zen Technologies makes driving simulators. His machines not only recreate the road on a computer screen, they actually tilt and rock to a driver's commands. They print out mistakes he makes at every turn. Alturi says this could save hundreds of lives, simply because it's so real.

Ashok Alturi, Chairman, Zen Technologies Limited, said, "We've designed it according to Indian conditions, so there are cows crossing the road, pedestrians jumping in suddenly, everything you could think of on a typical Indian road.

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