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Pandit Ravi Shankar's last session recordings to be released in May

Press Trust of India
Apr 12, 2013 at 07:33am IST

Washington: The last recordings of the world renowned sitar maestro Pandit Ravi Shankar would be released in May this year. This would be the first posthumous release of the recordings of Pandit Ravi Shankar, who died in December last year. In a statement on Thursday, East Meets West Music said that the three set of recordings to be released in May is part of the seven recordings that the Indian sitar maestro did in October 2011. The four of these recordings which were released in 2012, fetched him Grammy Award.

"In October 2011, at the age of 91, Ravi Shankar invited his long-time tabla accompanist, Tanmoy Bose, to his home in Encinitas, California for an informal recording session. Over four days, they worked in Shankar's living room, recording seven different ragas," East West Music said. It added that the resulting music is a combination of deep musical experience and brilliant technique performed with the energy and passion he brings to his live concerts. The first four of these ragas, released in 2012, won the Grammy Award for Best World Music Album.

"The Living Room Sessions Part 2 is no less noteworthy and masterly, with three of the last session recordings made by Maestro Ravi Shankar before his death in December 2012. Session Mishra Kafi introduces the set with a beautiful Alaap and Gat in medium tempo Deepchandi Taal," it said. Session Sindhi Bhairavi, with its Gat in Dadra and Teen Taal highlights the in-depth facility with rhythm and improvisational flow which he and Bose have built over the years of performing together, it said.

Pandit Ravi Shankar's last session recordings to be released in May

East Meets West Music said that the three set of recordings to be released in May is part of the seven recordings that the Indian sitar maestro did in October 2011.

"It's a real affirmation of Ravi's lifetime of true artistic improvisation that built a bridge between Indian Classical music and the West, the whole history of which can be heard in his playing on the Living Room Sessions," said Sukanya Shankar, his wife. "It may not have been his first Grammy but certainly a testimony to his drive to make music, no matter how many candles are on the birthday cake," she said.

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