Review :Snow White And the Huntsman' is potentially untapped

IANS
Jun 02, 2012 at 03:38pm IST

Fairytales have a unique ability. Depending on one's perspective, one can see them as either light or heavy, as funny or serious. So, while barely two months back you had 'Mirror Mirror', now you have 'Snow White And the Huntsman' - both different and unique renderings of the Snow White fairytale.

While 'Mirror Mirror' was a light, funny reading, this one's mood is dark and mysterious.

After killing Snow White's (Kristen Stewart) father, Ravenna (Charlize Theron) becomes queen and imprisons Snow White in the castle. She preys on young women to maintain her own beauty. When she is told by her faithful mirror that the only one who can permanently give her youth or take it away forever is the pure and innocent Snow White, she sends for her.

Review: 'Snow White' is potentially untapped

While 'Mirror Mirror' was a light, funny reading, 'Snow White And the Huntsman' is dark and mysterious.

Snow White escapes into the dark woods and Ravenna sends a huntsman (Chris Hemsworth) to find her and bring her back. But on realising who she is, the Huntsman and a ragtag group of dwarfs join her in her quest to return her kingdom to its former glory.

'Snow White' begins on shaky ground. The scene conceptualisation and execution seem lacklustre and uncertain in the beginning, but it picks up pace as it progresses.

The film tries very hard to be dark and gloomy. But despite a good try, it does not entirely reach its intention.

The shooting locations are fabulous. Some of the scenes use fantastic imaginations to thrill the viewers. The cinematography, production quality and costumes are simply stunning. However, the biggest let down is the direction, which fluctuates from excellent to average.

Chris Hemsworth is his usual groggy self in the film, while Kristen Stewart looks clueless throughout the film and her transformation, from a damsel in distress to one who leads an army, is not convincing. The dwarfs, who for a change are played by actual tall characters then digitally altered to look small, aren't exciting either.

However, it is Charlize Theron as the evil queen Ravenna who is the best. She steals the show with her villainous, ruthless act.

Overall, there was much scope to better the film, but it remains unutilised. One cannot accuse it of not trying. It tries really hard. All you can accuse it of is not succeeding.

Previous Comments

Latest

More from this section