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T20 fun, but Test ultimate yardstick of cricket skills: Sourav Ganguly

IANS
Feb 02, 2013 at 11:24pm IST

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Kolkata: Twenty20 cricket is fun, popular and money-spinning, but for former Indian skipper Sourav Ganguly, the five-day Test format is the ultimate yardstick of a cricketer's skills. The dashing left hander, who retired from international cricket four years back and played his career's last Twenty20 game last year, feels ultimately a player is remembered for his performances in Test cricket which is entirely a "different ball game".

"When you finish your cricket career, and go to cricket lectures, or see cricket archives, you will see photographs of Tiger (Mansoor Ali Khan) Pataudi, (Don) Bradman, (Sunil) Gavaskar, (Rahul) Dravid and (Sachin) Tendulkar who actually mastered Test cricket," he said. "Ultimately you will be remembered for what you do in Test cricket. T-20 is fun, it brings people to the ground, you can see Shah Rukh Khan dancing on the stands."

"But in Test cricket when you see (fast bowlers) Brett Lee or a (Glenn) McGrath who is going past your nose for six hour in a day, it's a different ball game," Ganguly said at the Kolkata Literary Meet after unveiling veteran actress Sharmila Tagore's book on her husband Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi.

T20 fun, but Test ultimate yardstick of cricket skills: Ganguly

Ganguly feels ultimately a player is remembered for his performances in Test cricket which is entirely a "different ball game".

Ganguly had no doubt in picking the best among the three formats of the game - Tests, One Dayers and T20s. "Test cricket will always be the best of the three. T20 will bring you the money. But if a player is to survive in t20 cricket, he has to be a good Test cricketer," Ganguly said.

On the other hand, taking a broad swipe at West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on the ruckus over author Salman Rushdie's cancellation of his trip to Kolkata, Ganguly said he never wrote his autobiography as he wanted to avoid becoming the subject of a frontpage controversy.

Ganguly felt there was no point in writing if he could not write everything. "Ya. It's over four years that I've left the big stage. I feel there is no point writing if you can't write everything. May be, the autobiography will come at a later date, but I don't know when," he said during a session at the Kolkata Literary Meet to queries why he was yet to write an autobiography.

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